Roosh Valizadeh Claims Bratz Dolls Are A Jewish Plot To ‘Groom’ Children

Recently, Roosh Valizadeh — a former pick-up artist and purveyor of rapey literature turned religious zealot — railed against what he called “cultural rot” in an episode of his Roosh Hour podcast. Valizadeh took aim at, among other things, Bratz dolls, which he suggested were a Jewish plot to “groom” young girls.

“How ’bout the toys?” Valizadeh asked. “The toys that they’re giving girls, maybe the toys is [sic] gonna be — have some value to it.” He showed a photo of Bratz dolls and added, “And by value I mean teaching your young daughters how to become prostitutes.”

He complained about the clothing on a pair of Bratz dolls, pointing out that he could see the “G-string” on one of them. He then pulled up another photo of the same dolls — this time the doll on the left had lipstick on its face. Valizadeh said this was evidence that the dolls are a “lesbianic [sic] couple.”

“I mean these are the kind of dolls you would buy to groom a young child in order to sexually abuse them,” he claimed. “That’s it. You would teach ‘Hey, look, this is the doll, this is how you dress. Oh, you’re dressing like that.’ I mean, this is what I think. This is a grooming tool.”

Then Valizadeh put an antisemitic twist on his rant, pulling up a photo of MGA Entertainment CEO Isaac Larian.

Larian is an Iranian-born Jew whose company produces the Bratz product line. Valizadeh commented that “his face reminds me of something,” and pointed to Larian’s “engorged” nose, “juicy, thick lips,” and “thin and snake-like” eyes.

“We can’t see him below the chest but I would imagine his hands are clasped together — rubbing,” he said. This is a nod to the antisemitic “Happy Merchant” meme which depicts “a drawing of a Jewish man with heavily stereotyped facial features who is greedily rubbing his hands together.”

Yesterday on Twitter, Valizadeh announced that his YouTube account had been banned, claiming it was this episode that violated YouTube’s guidelines. Prior to his ban Valizadeh tweeted “People don’t like Jews because of their behavior” and “109” — a reference to the expulsion of Jews from 109 nations.