Devin Saucier And Paul Kersey Laud President Trump’s ‘Pro-White’ Columbus Day Proclamation

Conquistadors

On the latest episode of Radio Renaissance, white supremacists Devin Saucier (a.k.a. Henry Wolff) and Paul Kersey heaped praise on President Trump for his “pro-white” Columbus Day proclamation. Saucier called Trump’s proclamation a “big deviation” from statements over the past eight years since it wasn’t “anti-white.”

Saucier read the following portion of the proclamation:

The permanent arrival of Europeans to the Americas was a transformative event that undeniably and fundamentally changed the course of human history and set the stage for the development of our great Nation.  Therefore, on Columbus Day, we honor the skilled navigator and man of faith, whose courageous feat brought together continents and has inspired countless others to pursue their dreams and convictions — even in the face of extreme doubt and tremendous adversity. More than five centuries after his initial voyage, we remember the “Admiral of the Ocean Sea” for building the critical first link in the strong and enduring bond between the United States and Europe.

Kersey, who runs the blog Stuff Black People Don’t Like, boasted that this statement “could’ve been written by someone like Peter Brimelow or Jared Taylor,” and called it “tremendous.” Saucier claimed that it was a “pro-white statement” without any “apology or guilt.”

Kersey also recalled that in 2006 he and a “very famous nationalist” saw the movie Apocalypto. Set in the Mayan Empire shortly before the arrival of the conquistadors, the film depicts a young man named Jaguar Paw as he tries to escape a ritualistic human sacrifice.

Somewhat predictably, Apocalypto was heavily criticized for its copious amounts of gore and perpetuation of tired racial stereotypes — part and parcel of nearly any Mel Gibson film. Kersey himself called the movie “brutal,” but only because it showed the “utter savagery” of Mayan culture.

“And at the very end, when the character who was trying to elude capture gets to the ocean shore, they all stop as two people — who he’s alluded the whole movie are trying to kill him — and they take a knee because they see in the ocean, in the distance, a ship and the white man coming,” he said. “Bearing a cross,” Saucier added.

Kersey praised Trump’s proclamation for “unapologetically pointing out the Christian roots of the Spaniards and Christopher Columbus, and then of course the subsequent colonization.”

Of course as Bartolomé de Las Casas wrote in his exposé of the Spanish occupation of Native lands, these very Christian conquistadors “spared no one, erecting especially wide gibbets on which they could string their victims up with their feet just off the ground and then burn them alive thirteen at a time, in honour of our Saviour and the twelve Apostles,” among other horrors.

Saucier’s rebuttals to such atrocities was to note that “when Columbus arrived here, the Indians were already enslaving each other. When they got in scuffles they would take captives, they would enslave them — they were actually in some ways more brutal than the European captors,” he insisted. Although, again, anyone who has read de Las Casas’ A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies would probably beg to differ.