Jazzhands McFeels And Jesse Dunstan Cry Voter Fraud In Alabama Special Election

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After Christian extremist and alleged pedophile Roy Moore was defeated in Alabama’s special election on December 12, the alt-right was devastated. Occidental Dissent’s Brad Griffin, for example, vowed to persuade his friends to never vote Republican again.

The thinking among white nationalists appeared to be that, so long as Mo Brooks wasn’t in the race, Moore was an acceptable substitute who would buck the GOP establishment and serve as a reliable vote for Trump’s agenda.

But when Doug Jones pulled off a surprise upset thanks to black voters, they were livid. And judging from the twentieth episode of their joint podcast Jazz & Jesse, racist podcasters Jazzhands McFeels and Jesse Dunstan were still smarting from the loss.

Dunstan said that the reason he backed Moore was because he wanted to “show the fucking kikes that they can’t do this to our people anymore.” He alleged that Jews ran a “naked, blatant smear campaign headed by Gloria Allred where they just trot out girls that he’s known in the past and say ‘Oh he did this, that, and the other.'”

On top of that he continued to insist that the yearbook was “forged,” since a handwriting expert never looked at it — which, incidentally, isn’t true.

And McFeels revealed that he at least had some reservations about backing Moore after the candidate all but admitted to dating teenage girls in an interview with Sean Hannity. Nevertheless, he and Dunstan believe that the only conceivable way Moore lost was through outright voter fraud.

Dunstan remarked that “no evidence has come out of any kind of real wrongdoing with voter fraud that we can really say.” However, he did claim that there was a “witness” who said voters were bused in to the polls. McFeels said he was “in contact with some people that were down in Alabama” and who sent him photos of fliers that offered people a ride to polling stations.

To be clear, transporting people to polling stations is not illegal or evidence of fraud, and both parties have made that part of their get-out-the-vote effort. However, it would cross the line to offer something of value in exchange for a person’s vote, which neither McFeels nor Dunstan have alleged.

But McFeels insisted that they have “circumstantial evidence” of fraud, including the fact that Alabama chose not to preserve digital images of the paper ballots. A group of Alabamian voters filed suit to have the digital images preserved, and a judge initially sided with them. However, the state Supreme Court stayed the judge’s order. Both of these decisions were made prior to the special election.

“Then you have that video from the Doug Jones celebration night where that non-white was like, ‘Oh it’s so amazing, all the people that came from all over the country to vote, and to canvass for Doug Jones,'” McFeels asserted. “It’s like, dude did you just misspeak or what are you fucking saying here?”

Dunstan said he didn’t misspeak, and claimed that Bob Creamer explained “how the whole scam works” — alluding to a Project Veritas video purporting to show a Democratic operative admitting to voter fraud.

Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe is a dishonest smear merchant, and his 2016 voter fraud exposé showed no evidence of wrongdoing. Like other victims of O’Keefe’s selectively edited “sting” videos, Creamer recently filed a civil suit against O’Keefe.

“No one ever could’ve predicted the way that blacks would’ve turned out,” McFeels said, “and even if you predicted blacks would turn out more than they did, a little bit, just overperformed slightly — I mean it was still [Moore’s] election to lose.” He admitted that the Democrats “mounted a better turn-out” but also accused them of suppressing the white vote.

“I hope something comes of this, ’cause that black turn-out is ridiculous,” Dunstan complained. “There’s no reason it shoulda happened. There’s just no way.” Saying that “no one” would be able to convince him that “some fucking shenanigans” didn’t happen in the special election, he wondered why Republicans won’t act to prevent “fraudulent black votes.”

McFeels replied that it was “funny” that the states that have “the long history of blacks being disenfranchised is the place where there are the least rules and where there’s the most fucking fraud.” (McFeels did not offer any evidence to back up this claim.) He also suggested that the issue of voter fraud was second only to building a wall and “deporting 30 million Mexicans” in terms of importance.

He also floated his pet theory of phantom black voters:

‘Cause otherwise it’s like, why bother even having a campaign? Like why bother even fucking talking about it? Because if they can just flip a switch, and erase the ballots the day after the election, and have four times the amount of black people just show up — or what I think they did … is they just took blacks who were registered in the system and they made their vote happen on the electronic voting machine. They didn’t have anybody show up. Black people didn’t show up to vote. They just pressed a button, they changed a zero to a one in the back end and made it happen.

Sure, some people react to defeat with denial. This, on the other hand, is outright lunacy.