These Are The Four Companies Chosen To Build Concrete Prototypes Of Trump’s ‘Big, Beautiful’ Border Wall

Border Wall Contractors

On August 31, 2017, the Trump administration announced its selection of four construction companies to build concrete prototypes of the President’s “big, beautiful” wall along the southern border.

As the Washington Post points out, Congress set aside some $20 million to build the prototypes, and each of the four contracts awarded is worth $400,000 to $500,000.

Construction of the concrete prototypes — which will measure 30 feet wide and up to 30 feet tall — will take place in San Diego in two weeks, and are expected to be completed within 30 days of breaking ground.

Below is information — including contact information — on the four construction companies chosen to build the concrete prototypes. Anyone who reaches out to them to voice their concerns should be polite and respectful at all times:

Name: Caddell Construction Co.
President/CEO: Eddie Stewart
About:
Based in Montgomery, AL, Caddell Construction Co. is a “select employee-owned company” founded in 1983. Its news section boasts of a $42,661,500 contract for a new Special Tactics Facility at Fort Bragg, NC, and a $32,935,000 contract for a “new state-of-the-art headquarters and operations complex” for the 2nd Radio Battallion at Camp Lejeune, NC.
Contact Information: Caddell Construction lists its phone number as (+1) 334 272-7723 and its fax number as (+1) 334 272-8844. Their Twitter account is @CaddellConst.

Name: Fisher Sand & Gravel
President: Thomas Fisher
About: Fisher Sand & Gravel — the parent company of Fisher Industries — maintains its Southwest operations in Tempe, AZ. According to its website, the company “mine[s] over 30 million tons of aggregate materials and perform[s] over 100 projects.” In 2011 Fisher Sand & Gravel and a subsidiary were fined $312,000 by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality for dumping waste into Oak Creek. And in 2013 it was fined another $150,000 by the Justice Department and the EPA for dust violations in Maricopa County.
Contact Information: The phone number of their Arizona office is listed as 877-796-9238, while the toll free phone number to their company headquarters is 800-932-8740. Their Twitter account is @Fisher_Ind.

Name: Texas Sterling Construction Co.
President: Jorge A. Laris
About: Texas Sterling Construction Co. (“TSC”) operates out of Houston, TX, and describes itself as a “leading heavy civil, highway and municipal construction company with a 60-year successful track record of building and reconstruction of transportation, marine, airfield and water infrastructure.” Its featured projects include work on the Chisholm Trail Parkway (2 contracts worth $153 million) and a Metro Light Rail in Houston (1 contract worth $80.2 million).
Contact Information: The phone number for TSC’s Houston office is (281) 821-9091, and its fax number is (281) 821-2995.

Name: W. G. Yates & Sons Construction Co.
President/CEO: William Yates
About: W. G. Yates & Sons Construction Co. (“Yates Construction”) has its corporate headquarters in Philadelphia, Mississippi, lists numerous projects, including correctional facilities, a Border Patrol station, and military barracks. Yates Construction is the largest construction company in Mississippi, and the Yates family “donates heavily to mostly Republican candidates.”
Contact Information: The phone number for its corporate headquarters is (601) 656-5411. Its fax number is (601) 656-8958.

Following the construction of these concrete prototypes this fall, a new set of contracts will be awarded to construction companies to build the border wall itself.

Those contracts may or may not be awarded to the companies that built the prototypes. Estimates for the border wall’s cost range from $21.6 billion to $70 billion, excluding maintenance.

And while a wall was a central promise of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign — and one which he’s willing to shut the government down over — in a private call to Mexican President Peña Nieto, Trump downplayed its importance, calling it the “least important thing we were talking about” from an “economic issue.”